The Hiking Boots

I purchased my first pair of real hiking boots in preparation for a hike that I have planned in September (more on that later, for sure).
I laced them up, (apparently I'm supposed to wear them one or two hours a day to get used to them) to go walk the dog in the morning.  Yes, I look weird, in my shorts, t-shirt, and hiking boots, but I really don't care.  They feel awesome.  This is probably normal attire in Colorado.
I walk differently.  I walk way more sure-footed, and my weak ankles are secure.
Got me thinking about Ephesians 6 and the armor of God.  Specifically verse 15:
"with your feet fitted with the readiness that comes from the Gospel of Peace"

In context, Paul was writing these verses as what a Christian should put on each day in order to fight the enemy.  I love good competition, so when I'm lacing up my boots and walking now, I feel stronger, and am reminded to pray on readiness for whatever comes my way that day.  Paul's footing was sure and unshakable, that's for sure!

The shoes the Romans wore had strong soles with spikes coming out the bottom so they didn't slip.  They weren't covered too much over the top - it was the bottom and the protection from whatever they stepped on that was more important.  Their shoes allowed them to step freely - on sometimes painful ground without fear so they could focus on the battle at hand.  So when our feet our fitted in the Gospel, we, too, can go through some painful circumstances and not fear the outcome.

Walking the same path on the same sidewalk every day is not as exciting as what you can do when you have new boots.  When I walk now,  I go in and out of yards (not the pristine ones), up and down curbs, and stuff like that to get my feet used to changing terrain in the boots.  As we travel new paths, new muscles grow, we become more balanced, and realize how cool it is to take on new adventures as we go out on The Great Commission!

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