Unbroken or Broken?

I had the pleasure of forcing myself to read Unbroken, by Laura Hillenbrand, for the past two weeks in order to be ready for an interview with Louis Zamperini (the man of whom the book is about) at church this weekend.
It was an awesome book, and I can understand why it was on the New York Times best seller list for 92 weeks.
However, I could not figure out why our Pastor wanted to interview Zamperini until the last few pages.  THAT was my favorite part.

Spoiler Alert:
The title "Unbroken" characterizes Zamperini's life for 90% of the book, but in the end, he is broken, and that characterizes his life from then on.  Thanks to Billy Graham, the man who was known for his strength, allowed himself to be broken.  And, it is in the breaking, that he was made whole.  Who else can completely take away revenge from a man's heart?  Who else can repair an almost broken marriage?  Who else can restore nightmares to peace?  Jesus.  The only One who can make a broken vessel whole again.

Zamperini's unbrokenness showed others how strong he was.  But, it's in his brokenness at the end, that allowed God to come in and give himself the inner strength that others saw.  He could not see his need for a Savior until he realized his own weakness  There is a strength that we might have deep down, but it is not complete until we see our weakness and allow ourselves to be broken and filled with a strength that comes from the one who made us.  When we realize this, God can use us to do even greater things than we could have done on our own.

Psalm 66:9 - 12  resembles a lot of Zamperini's life:
"He has preserved our lives - tested us - refined us - brought us into prison - laid burdens on our backs - let men ride over our heads - we went through fire and water - 
BUT you brought us to a place of abundance!"
It is this place of abundance that Louis Zamperini is basking in, and hoping to see very soon, all at the same time.

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